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Actor Aaron McNicholl hails all the way from Dungannon, County Tyrone in Northern Ireland and emigrated to the US during The Troubles. In the film Charlie Gorman's Wake, Aaron plays a pub regular named Mick Morris who gets into a particular bit of troubles himself under the influence of impaired judgement. In the interview below Aaron talks about the unique nature of the work and the play on which it was based.
Charlie Starrs emigrated to the US over 40 years ago from Omagh, Ireland and founded the Gaelic Players to bring high-quality Irish theatre to the greater New Haven area. In Charlie Gorman’s Wake, Starrs plays Father Ward, a ball-breaking priest with a penchant for mischief. In this interview, Starrs talks about the legacy of Irish literature in the work of writer/director Paul Pender.
In both the play as well as the film version of Charlie Gorman’s Wake, Peter Lynch stars as the titular Charlie Gorman, a pub regular in the fictional Irish village of Ballycarraig who finds a home away from home in a pint of Guinness along with the other denizens of Gorman’s Bar. Peter himself comes all the way from the “People’s Republic of Cork” and began performing with the New Haven Gaelic Players in 1980. Check out Peter’s take on the character in the video below.
Back in the early 90s, filmmakers like Robert Rodriguez, Richard Linklater and Kevin Smith re-ignited interest in low-budget independent filmmaking with the success of films like El Mariachi, Slacker and Clerks on estimated budgets of $7,000, $23,000 and $27,000 respectively. Mariachi’s dirty little secret is that it cost Columbia another $200,000 to transfer the print to film and fix the sound, but Rodriguez wouldn’t have had that problem today. Apple’s introduction of a 4K-capable Mac Pro an... [Read more]

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In light of the recent NSA* leaks regarding the PRISM and Boundless Informant programs, I’ve decided to come forward and detail our own secret technological advances in order to establish a more transparent and open society. Somewhat smaller in scope, our project was likely conceived in a fashion similar to the NSA’s total information awareness initiative (in a room, with chairs, and probably a table; we both used computers). While the NSA is pulling down billions of pieces of intelligence a m... [Read more]
Go behind the scenes with the cast and crew of Charlie Gorman's Wake on the set at The Old Dublin in Wallingford, Connecticut.

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Indie Film Diary: DIY

May 17, 2013
These days, independent filmmakers have a wide variety of resources at their disposal for achieving a professional look for minimal cost. Online DIY gurus like the folks over at Indymogul and Film Riot have done a ton of homework to bring you no-nonsense, cost-effective ways to build Home Depot versions of the gear the pros use. For our fundraising video we decided to save a few bucks while investigating whether or not DIY Kinos and a shoulder rig would be viable on the actual production.[more... [Read more]

Indie Film Diary: Production - Day 1

May 9, 2013
We packed the night before and hauled everything out to the set bright and early. We had scheduled several interviews for the day along with two scenes and had to test out the lights and build part of the set before the actors arrived at noon. Read more...

Indie Film Diary: Pre-Production

May 3, 2013
A mutual friend put me in touch with a playwright who was looking to make the jump into independent filmmaking. This is usually the part where I roll my eyes and think about the colossal amount of work that goes into producing a film. The playwright turned out to be the owner of an Irish pub I had fond memories of and we sat down to talk over a few pints. He did indeed have a screenplay and I was relieved to find that it was good. As an Irishman who emigrated to the States over 21 years ago,... [Read more]

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Trance Director: Danny Boyle Release Date: April 5 Danny Boyle is quietly becoming an event film director behind a surprisingly experimental and disparate body of work. Boyle is unconstrained by genre and his cinematic triumphs are often as much about style as they are about narrative. Trainspotting, The Beach, 28 Days Later, Sunshine, Slumdog Millionaire and 127 Hours are all wildly different but each exhibits his high energy visual imprint. His latest is a heist movie revolving around an ... [Read more]