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It's more than a ticket.

Ticket Liquidator Glossary Page



Ticket Industry Glossary


Box Office: An office at venues where event tickets are bought, held, and eventually accessed (known as “will call” for ticket pick-up purposes).


Event: A unique combination of name, date, time, and venue used to identify a given concert, play/musical, game, or other such performance.


Face Value: The price printed on a ticket and one normally dictated by the performers and/or promoters of the event itself. Face value is not to be confused with the real-world market value of event tickets. This is because event promoters often print a lower price on a ticket than what it’s actually worth. The intention in that regard is to ensure high event turnouts and larger concession stand purchases by event-goers. Tickets are sold for face value on the primary market and market value on the secondary market.


Inventory: The event tickets that are possessed by a given ticket seller at a given time. The ticket sellers who resell tickets through Ticket Liquidator each have access to different ticket inventories. Some specialize in certain event types (eg: sports or concerts) or events in only certain locales. Some are also much better equipped than others when it comes to accessing premium event seating. Sites like Ticket Liquidator eliminate this catalog distinction by pooling together inventories from multiple sellers. This conglomeration allows for one-stop shopping and cheaper ticket prices via public price competition.


Live Nation: The largest promoter for entertainment events in the United States (they recently fused with Ticketmaster - see below). You may see the “Live Nation” branding imprinted on some event tickets bought through Ticket Liquidator. This simply means that the tickets themselves originally were purchased from Live Nation.


Market Value: The price set by the free market for event tickets regardless of ticket face value. Market value is based on an event’s popularity and is best defined as whatever the public is willing to pay for a given ticket. Tickets sold through Ticket Liquidator are being sold at their market value rather than their face value. This is also true for the vast majority of other products that people purchase on a daily basis. Market value is known for best reflecting what a given product is actually worth. This realistic pricing is in contrast to flat price diktats established regardless of a product’s popularity.


On-sale: The established time at which tickets for a given event are initially released for sale to the general public. Many ticket sellers who sell through Ticket Liquidator access event tickets after their on-sale date. Other sellers have special connections that enable them to access event tickets prior to that date. This “sneak peek” access enables customers to access tickets from Ticket Liquidator that they might not be able to access elsewhere.


Pre-Sales: The process of selling event tickets to select groups of people prior to their later release to the general public. Ticket pre-sale opportunities are often presented to fan club members or other people with special industry connections. Many licensed ticket resellers have access to these influential channels and use them to procure high-quality seating. This early buying is oftentimes the only way that premium seats are accessed and made freely available to the public. Ticket Liquidator can therefore help customers access event tickets that might otherwise be considered too VIP for general dispersal.


Primary Ticket Market: The market where event tickets are initially sold to the public through first-hand sources with direct ticket access. These direct sales are typically handled by ticket-selling organizations with an intimate hand in ticket printing and/or event planning. Examples include corporate giants like Ticketmaster or the venues where a given show or game is being performed. These first-hand sellers typically sell tickets at their face value with added fees and charges attached. Primary markets are generally known for being cheaper in product price than secondary resale markets.


Promoter: A wealthy individual or organization responsible for sponsoring and funding a team, a performer, or a performance. A “promoter” in the ticketing industry is like a “producer” in the film industry. Promoters are often tasked with arranging ticket printing and/or distribution for the event that they’re promoting. Secondary market sellers (like Ticket Liquidator) are not involved with ticket printing and distribution issues.


Secondary Ticket Market: The market where event tickets are resold to the public after being bought initially on the primary market. Ticket Liquidator and other online websites are actually secondary rather than primary market websites. Sellers posting on Ticket Liquidator are reselling tickets they initially purchased from primary market sellers (eg: Ticketmaster or the venue). Please note that secondary market sellers in all industries charge a commission fee for reselling products after their initial sale. This is to compensate the sellers for the extra fees charged by primary distributors and for keeping event tickets publicly available longer than usual. The commission fee for resellers in the secondary ticket market is reflected in the price mark-up at which event tickets are resold.


Service Fee: The convenience fee charged to compensate businesses for facilitating and handling product orders. Other names for service fees include “handling,” “processing,” or (again) “convenience” charges. Please note that all businesses charge a service fee of some sort to their respective customers. This includes all relevant actors in the primary and secondary ticket markets (websites and ticket sellers). Service fees for ticket resale websites often range between 20-30% of the ticket price of the tickets purchased. (Ticket Liquidator has one of the lowest service fees in the ticket resale industry - 18.5%.)


"Sold-out" Events: When a given game or show has either very few tickets available for purchase or perhaps none at all. Please note that “sold out” is a term that usually applies to the primary ticket market rather than the secondary market. It's very likely that event tickets will still be available on the secondary ticket market up to the day of the event itself. This is because the price mark-up charged by ticket resellers makes tickets pricier and thus keeps them from being purchased too quickly. It’s therefore important to remember that the term “sold-out” is often not an accurate reflection of ticket availability for a given show or game. You should always check Ticket Liquidator if a venue or primary ticket source throws up their hands and tells you there “no tickets are available!”


Ticketmaster: The largest seller on the primary ticket market and the initial source for many event tickets resold on the Ticket Liquidator exchange. You may see the “Ticketmaster” branding imprinted on some tickets bought through Ticket Liquidator. This simply means that the tickets themselves originally were purchased from Ticketmaster.


Ticket Broker: A registered company that re-sells tickets to events on a professional basis (ie: for a career). Most of the event tickets listed on our website are being resold by licensed ticket-selling brokers (usually companies). “Licensed” means that they are certified and/or registered with a professional government and/or civic organization. Examples of such professional organizations include the Better Business Bureau and the Better Ticketing Association. Ticket Liquidator ensures that the sellers who resell through us are official companies in order to ensure the legitimacy of tickets sold through our exchange and the professionalism of those tickets’ suppliers. (TL furthermore maintains our own rating system to rank sellers based on their order performance.)


Ticket Exchange: A secondary market where event tickets are resold by consumers and/or licensed ticket-selling companies. Ticket exchanges are an internet-based phenomenon powered by such nationwide networks as Ticket Liquidator. The basic purpose of such ticket exchanges is to facilitate and monitor ticket transactions between the public and individual ticket sellers. Ticket Liquidator is thus roughly analogous to EBay in terms of our function and purpose (except for the fact that we only deal with tickets). Our major purpose is to allow consumers to buy popular event tickets in a secure and customer-friendly forum. (You can find out more about the special perks we offer our customers here!)


Ticket Scalper: An unlicensed individual or company who re-sells tickets to events in non-professional circumstances. The term “scalper” is derogatory and is usually applied to resellers who resell tickets illegally or without certification.


Ticket Seller: Any individual or organization that resells tickets regardless of legal business status or official accreditation. The term “ticket seller” is often used to reference non-licensed ticket resale from average ticket-buying consumers. Ticket Liquidator actually provides the ability for unlicensed consumers to resell tickets via its online exchange. It’s nevertheless important to note that consumer sellers can only resell their event tickets under certain security-related conditions. These added restrictions are designed to protect the end buyer of ticket orders from any ticketing mishaps. (You can find out more information about how to resell your tickets online by going here!)


Venue: The physical location where a given show or game is scheduled to occur, such as Madison Square Garden or Wrigley Field.


Delivery Methods Glossary


FedEx Standard Delivery ($15): Tickets are shipped using an expedited 2-3 business-day shipping service. This delivery method is our most typical and used for the vast majority of ticket orders. Please also note that FedEx Standard does not consider weekends or holidays to be active shipping days.


FedEx Express Delivery: Tickets are shipped using an expedited 1-2 business-day shipping service. This delivery method is best used when the event concerned is within 72 hours away. Please also note that FedEx Express does not consider weekends or holidays to be active shipping days. This means that you shouldn’t choose FedEx Express late in the week for shipping to a weekend event. (Note: Ticket sellers reserve the right to upgrade and charge customers automatically for this expedited shipping service if FedEx Express Delivery is required (but not chosen by the customer) for timely ticket delivery.)


International Express Delivery ($40): Tickets are shipped using an expedited international delivery method that typically takes 5-7 business days. This delivery method is only used when the seller of an order is located in a different country from the customer. It automatically appears after a customer selects an appropriate international shipping location on the checkout page. Please note that international shipments may experience delays in delivery that are beyond the control of Ticket Liquidator. These include customs delays, transit delays, weather delays, and variations in local service availability. Please also note that ticket sellers can only ship to a given country if that country is listed specifically in the relevant drop-down menu on the checkout page.


E-Voucher ($5): Tickets will be sent as a PDF document to the email account of the customer concerned. Voucher delivery is very rare and only used for certain events in such select locations as Las Vegas.


Near-Term Special Delivery ($15): Tickets are received according to one of four options specified by the ticket seller of an order. Near-Term Special Delivery will appear as the default option when an event is too close in time to allow for physical shipping. This includes same day-orders for tickets and also tickets ordered on Friday (or late Thursday) for Sunday or Saturday events. (Neither FedEx Standard nor Express Shipping actively ships tickets on the weekends - thus, the Near-Term requirement.) The method itself encompasses four possible means of ticket delivery whose ultimate selection is at the sole discretion of the ticket seller. These four methods are:


Email ($15/$7.50): Tickets will be emailed to the customer by the ticket seller using (eg) a PDF attachment. You will need to contact your ticket seller for more information about when you’ll receive the email. It should not be assumed that emailable tickets will be emailed within X number of hours after placing an order. This is important to keep in mind in order to ensure delivery in relation to travel plans. Please note that the fee for email delivery varies depending on the ticket seller and can be either $7.50 or $15. Whichever payment option appears on the checkout page represents the seller’s verdict on the fee issue.


Will Call ($15): Tickets will be available for pickup at the box office of the venue where the event is being held usually an hour before the event. You will need to contact your ticket seller directly for more specific information about when you can access the tickets. Please note that the delivery fee for will call is set at $15 to compensate the seller for paying an employee to drive to the venue, park, and drop off the tickets.


Local Pickup Near Venue ($15): Tickets will be available for local pickup at a third party location specified by the ticket seller. You will need to contact your ticket seller for more specific information on where and when to pick up the tickets. This typically occurs at an official establishment roughly 30 minutes from the venue where the event is being held. Pick-up locations might (and do) include hotels, restaurants, cafes, or the actual office of the ticket seller. Please note that the delivery fee for local pick-up is set at $15 regardless of the pick-up time or location.


Last Minute Pick-up ($15): Tickets will be available for local pickup at a ticket seller’s office within a few miles of the venue. Last-Minute Pickup involves the pickup location for an order being established and revealed to the customer ahead of time. Pickup will take place no sooner than 2 hours before the event and at the actual office of a ticket-selling company who has agreed to hold your seller’s tickets at a central location. This means that the company at which you access your tickets will be different from the company supplying your order.


FedEx Saturday Delivery ($15): This delivery method is only relevant for orders placed on Friday or late Thursday for Saturday or Sunday events. Ticket sellers have the option to ship such orders via FedEx Saturday Delivery to guarantee ticket arrival on Saturday. Please note that customers should not infer that ticket sellers will use FedEx Saturday Shipping by default for late Thursday or Friday ordering. The decision to use FedEx Saturday Delivery is at the sole discretion of the ticket seller. This means customers should contact their seller directly for confirmation about ticket delivery possibilities for late Thursday or Friday orders.


Courier ($15): Tickets will be delivered to the customer via a courier service. This delivery option is rare and only used for certain occasional events. You will need to contact the actual seller of a ticket order for more specifics about the option itself.


Note: See the FAQ Page for more specific information on how to arrange ticket orders that require Near-Term Special Delivery. The delivery methods mentioned above may also appear as separate delivery options during checkout.


Ticket Type Glossary


Hard Tickets: Tickets that are printed on cardboard material by the box office of the venue where the event is being held. “Hard” tickets are so-called because of their sturdy texture to distinguish them from newer and more electronic types of event ticketing. They remain today the most well-known and the most “typical” type of event ticket in popular perception. Please note that a given set of tickets is not guaranteed to be “hard” unless officially stated as such in their listing notes.


E-Tickets: Tickets that are emailed by the primary ticket source to the initial buyer of a ticket purchase. E-tickets usually originate in a PDF attachment that sellers then download and send to end ticket buyers. Sellers prefer to ship e-tickets for security concerns so as to limit possible ticket over-printing. Some sellers also access tickets from other secondary suppliers only in printed format. This resultantly means that they don’t have the ability to provide PDF documents for customers directly. Please nevertheless note that e-tickets are just as legitimate and valid as traditional “hard” tickets. Ticket Liquidator further enforces security standards to protect against possible ticket re-printing.


Paper Tickets: Another term for e-tickets (see above) after they’re printed out on paper and shipped to customers.


Ticketfast: A specific type of “e-ticket” promoted and distributed by primary ticket supplier Ticketmaster.


Paperless Tickets: A new technology that allows customer to access events by having their identity as the ticket purchaser electronically verified. Paperless ticketing is so-called because it does not result in physical tickets being sent to the initial ticket buyer. Ticketing information is instead associated electronically with the credit card used for the ticket purchase. Accessing events using paperless tickets in the resale market requires a representative from a seller’s office to escort customers into the event or else provide a gift card used for the initial ticket purchase. (More information on paperless tickets and how to access events using them can be found here.)


Physical Tickets: Slang used by some ticket sellers to indicate that a given set of tickets is not paperless.


Flash Tickets: A new technology that allows customers to access events using receipts dispersed by a kiosk at the event’s venue. Accessing flash tickets requires swiping a credit card containing the purchaser’s information at a venue kiosk. A receipt will be printed and the customer will subsequently be able to attend the event using the data printed. Flash ticketing is limited in its popularity and often used only for certain sporting events. (More information on flash tickets and how to access events using them can be found here.)


Ticket Note Glossary


"Aisle Seats": Meaning that one of a given selection of seats is located on an aisle (aisle seats are usually listed by sellers in pairs). Some sellers will caveat aisle seats by letting customers know that they have to buy X number of tickets in order to guarantee an aisle seat.


"Alcohol Free": Meaning that the venue has chosen to prohibit alcoholic beverages in a given section of seating. Sellers are required to advertise on their listings if they’re selling tickets for a section and/or row deemed to be alcohol-free.


"All Days": Meaning that a ticket purchase is relevant for all the days and/or sessions of a staggered event. (The term itself usually applies to different sporting games or sessions within a larger sporting event. Tickets for sessions are often sold as either for one or more games in the overall timeframe.)


"All Sessions": See “All Days.”


"Badge": Meaning an identification worn by event-goers that serves as a ticket guaranteeing access to an event. Badges are typically attached to a lanyard (a short cord) and most popularly used for golfing events.


"Baseline": Meaning that the tickets are located next or and/or near one of the bases in a baseball venue.


"Behind Server": Meaning seats that are located behind the area where tennis players serve their opponents.


"Blue Line": Meaning seats that are located near one of the blue lines known for demarcating hockey ice rinks.


"Center X": Meaning that the tickets are located alongside the center of a given sporting venue or venue section. Please note that the word “center” is subjective and based on the seller’s opinion.


"Chairbacks": Meaning that the tickets concerned are for seats that have backs in their design. The term is used to distinguish backed seating from non-based seating (benches).


"Close to Stage/Field": Meaning that the tickets concerned are “close” to the stage/field of a given venue. Please note that the word “close” is subjective and based on the seller’s opinion.


"Corner": Meaning that the tickets concerned are located in a corner area of a venue vis-à-vis the stage/field. Corner seats usually provide a more angled view of the staging area of an event.


"Courtside": Meaning seats that are located along the side of a court in a basketball venue. Courtside seating usually refers to the venue sections closest to the court itself.


"Covered": Meaning that the seats concerned are located underneath a covered area (often a section overhang).


"Dugout": Meaning that the seats concerned are located behind a team dugout at a baseball event. Please note that dugout seats are not necessarily located immediately behind a dugout. Dugout seating is also often caveated by reference to “home” or “visitor team” dugouts.


"E-tickets/E-tix/E-digital": Meaning that the tickets concerned are sent to the ticket seller in an emailable or downloadable format. Some sellers may email e-tickets, but many prefer to print and ship them (see “Paper Tickets”).


"End Zone": Meaning that the tickets are located in-between the goal-line and end-line of a given venue. The term itself is most often used to describe seating for hockey and football events.


"Est. Ship/Del Date": Meaning that a given set of tickets will likely ship or be delivered on or by the date provided. Please note that estimated dates of any such type are only estimated and thus not guaranteed.


"Family Section": Meaning that a given section (usually of a sporting event) is alcohol-free and family-friendly. Sellers are required to advertise on their listings if they’re selling tickets for a section and/or row deemed to be alcohol-free.


"Face-Off Circle": Meaning seats that are located perpendicular to the face-off circle in a sporting event. The face-off circle is found for basketball and hockey events and is centered on the court/rink.


"Flash Tickets": Meaning that the tickets concerned are flash tickets that will be accessible by swiping a gift card (supplied by the ticket seller) at a venue kiosk. (You can find more information about accessing events using flash tickets by visiting the FAQ Page.)


"Full Day": Meaning that the tickets concerned allow entry to an entire day of festivities rather than only part of the day. The term “full day” is relevant for golfing events and also tickets to events without set attendance schedules (eg: music festivals).


"Full Strip": Meaning that a ticket purchase is relevant for all given games of a sporting series rather than a single game. (eg: A playoff strip would include tickets to every one of a team’s playoff games.)


"Full View": Meaning that the tickets concerned provide a “full”/wide view of the stage or field. Please note that the term “full view” is subjective and based on the ticket seller’s opinion.


"Free-Throw Line": Meaning seats that are located perpendicular to the free-throw line in basketball events. The free-throw line is located some 20 ft from each basket on a basketball court.


"Front Row of Section": Meaning that a ticket listing contains seats located in the front row of a given sectionin the venue. Please note that the term does not necessarily refer to the first row in the entire venue.


"Frontstretch": Meaning seats that are located near the Start/Finish line of a playing field (usually a race track).


"General Admission": Meaning that seats are accessed on a first-come, first-serve basis on the same day as the event itself. Customers in GA seating do not receive actual seat numbers and instead sit or stand at will in the allotted area.


"Goal Line": Meaning that the tickets are located alongside the goal-line of a sporting venue. The term itself is most often used to describe seating in football and hockey events.


"Grounds Pass": Meaning a ticket that gives customers general access to the grounds for an event. Grounds passes are frequently found for golfing events or multi-event festivals.


"Hard Tickets": Meaning that the tickets concerned are originals printed out on cardboard ticket stock. Hard tickets are the “traditional” ticket types with which people are most familiar.


"Home Side”: Meaning that the tickets concerned are located on the side of a sporting venue where the home team of the event is situated. Most venue maps are labeled with “home” and visitor” sides (except in cases where side allocation is ambiguous).


"In Hand": Meaning that the ticket seller listing the tickets actually has them in their office. This separates them from sellers still waiting to receive their tickets from their supplier.


"In Pairs": Meaning that tickets from the listing concerned can only be sold by the ticket seller in pairs (eg: 2, 4, 6 - etc). Ticket sellers may not be able to supply consecutive inventory if purchases are not made in pairs.


"In Shade": Meaning that the seats concerned are located in a shady area of seating (often under a covering).


"In Stock": See “In Hand.”


"Infield": Meaning that the seats concerned are located inside the field proper of a sporting event. The term “infield” in baseball refers to seating geographically parallel to the bottom half of the baseball diamond. The term is also used to describe some NASCAR seating (or RV parking) alongside the race track.


"Limited View": Meaning that the seats concerned are labeled as visually compromised by the venue. Please note that the venue and the venue alone is responsible for such a designation. Seats that aren't dubbed visually blocked by the venue are not considered to be compromised. (See the FAQ Page for more information about our standards for partial and obstructed view labeling.)


"Local Pick-up (Day of Show)": Meaning that the tickets concerned will be picked up by the customer at a location near the venue. The term itself is used to refer to “Local Pickup” situations and also “paperless ticket” scenarios. (See the Delivery Methods Glossary for more information.) Customers will have to contact their ticket seller directly for additional information about pick-up deliveries.


"Lower Level”/”Lowers": Seats that are located in the lower level sections (ie: closer to the field/stage) of a given venue. Especially relevant if a venue has upper and lower sections with the same section numbers.


"Meet and Greet": 1) Meaning that a given listing includes or encompasses a ticket to a special meeting with the star performer/s before the show. 2) Meaning that the customer must meet a representative from the ticket seller at the venue to access the tickets concerned. (Customers should examine ticket listing notes carefully to ascertain any details about what performer-based "Meet and Greets" entail.)


"Midfield": Meaning that the tickets concerned are located roughly in the vertical middle of a given field.


"No Split": Meaning the seller of a particular listing is not willing to provide tickets except in the quantities listed (eg: wanting 2 tickets in a listing advertised as “1 or 3” tickets). Sellers often like to provide tickets in pairs in order to limit the chance that they’ll be stuck with a single ticket for sale (very hard to sell).


"Not a Game/Show Ticket": Meaning that the tickets concerned do not allow access to an event itself. This phrase is usually found for parking passes, club passes, and other non-entry tickets.


"Obstructed View": Meaning that the seats concerned are labeled as visually compromised by the venue. Please note that the venue and the venue alone is responsible for such a designation. Seats that aren't dubbed visually blocked by the venue are not considered to be compromised. (See the FAQ Page for more information about our standards for partial and obstructed view labeling.)


"Open air seating": Meaning that the seats concerned are located in an unenclosed area of seating.


"Outfield": Meaning that the seats concerned are located adjacent to the grassy expanse outside the baseball diamond in baseball events. Outfield seating is usually elevated (bleacher seating dominates) and is the farthest seating from the game’s action.


"Paperless Tickets": Meaning that the tickets concerned are paperless and will require the customer to be escorted into the venue by a representative from the ticket company. Other customers may access the event by presenting a gift card to venue personnel sent to them by their order’s supplier. (You can find more information about accessing events using paperless tickets by visiting the FAQ Page.)


"Paper Tickets": Meaning that the tickets concerned are printed out on paper rather than on cardboard ticket stock. (See the Ticket Type Glossary for more details.)


"Partial View": Meaning that the seats concerned are labeled as visually compromised by the venue. Please note that the venue and the venue alone is responsible for such a designation. Seats that aren't dubbed visually blocked by the venue are not considered to be compromised. (See the FAQ Page for more information about our standards for partial and obstructed view labeling.)


"Piggybacked": Meaning that the seats concerned are located in back of or in front of each other (eg: 2 in Row A, 2 in Row B). This is to distinguish them from those listings wherein the seats are side-by-side.


"Preshow Party/Dinner": Meaning that a pre-show event or party is accessible using the tickets concerned. Please note that this does not necessarily mean a ticket to the event itself is included in the package.


"Sell High to Low": Meaning that the ticket seller will sell the higher seat numbers (eg: F23) before the lower ones (eg: F07). Higher seat numbers are usually closer to the action than lower seats numbers.


"Service Line": Meaning that the seats concerned are perpendicular to the servicing line on a tennis court. The service line is located towards the end of the court where players serve their opponent.


"Side of Stage": Meaning that the tickets concerned are located off to the side of a given stage. Please note that the term itself does not necessarily guarantee seats close to the stage itself.


"Sideline": Meaning that the tickets are located along the elongated side of a given playing area. The term itself is most often used to describe seating for sporting (football) events.


"Ship By/On…": Meaning that the tickets concerned will likely be shipped by the seller by/on a given date. “Ship By/On” notes are usually followed by a specific date for estimated ticket shipment. Please note that such dates are only estimated and cannot be guaranteed.


"Ship Imd": Meaning that the ticket seller estimates they’ll be able to ship the tickets soon after an order is placed.


“Shoots X (# of times): Meaning that a given team will try to score goals X number of times at a given end of a venue.


"Split": Meaning that the tickets concerned will be “split up” (ie: not seated together) at the point listed. “Split” notices usually specify a seating quantity above which tickets may be split. (eg: “up to 4, no split” would mean customers couldn’t be guaranteed more than 4 seats together)


"S”/”SR”/”SRO”: See “Standing Room.”


"Standing Room”: Meaning that the tickets concerned are for a venue section that does not contain actual seats. Customers will access the area on a first-come, first-serve basis and stand throughout the event.


"Ready to Ship": Meaning that the tickets concerned are in the seller’s office and ready for shipping by the seller.



"Reserved Seat": Meaning seats for an event that are reserved by seat number for individual customers. The term itself is used to distinguish guaranteed seats from General Admission tickets.


"Ticketfast": See “e-tickets.”


“Upper Level”/”Uppers”: Seats that are located in the upper level sections (ie: closer to the field/stage) of a given venue. Especially relevant if a venue has upper and lower sections with the same section numbers.


"Visitor Side”: Meaning that the tickets concerned are located on the side of a sporting venue where the challenging team of the event is situated. Most venue maps are labeled with “home” and visitor” sides (except in cases where side allocation is ambiguous).


"WC (“Wheelchair Accessible”): Meaning that the tickets concerned are handicapped and/or wheelchair accessible.


"Will Call": Meaning that the tickets concerned will be left for pick-up at the box office of the event’s venue.


"Yard-line": Meaning seats that are located alongside or between certain yard lines for a football event.


Venue Seating Glossary


*, #, @: Various symbols used by some ticket sellers to make their particular listing “stand out” from the crowd. Odd symbols on ticket groups are a marketing tactic and don’t have any specific value vis-a-vis venue seating.


ALL SECs ("All Sections"): Meaning that the tickets concerned could be located within any section in a given venue/area. Examples include "400-Level, All Secs" or simply "All Secs, Rows A-R.”


BADGE: An identification worn by event-goers that serves as a means to guarantee entry to an event. Badges are typically attached to a lanyard (a short cord) and used for golfing events.


BAL/BALC ("Balcony"): A raised area in theater venues that overhangs the Orchestra, the Mezzanine, and/or the Loge. The Balcony is almost always the uppermost seating area in a theater venue.


BEST AVAILABLE: A term meaning that the ticket seller for a listing will provide customers with the best row and/or section they have available in their inventory. Please note that such general listings guarantee customers no specific seating location. Customers should not purchase from such listings if they prefer more specified seating.


BLCH (Bleacher”): An abbreviation used for Bleacher (raised) seating (usually in sporting events).


BX (“Box”): An abbreviation used to describe a (usually premium) seating area in sporting events.


CLUB: A special section of seating in stadium and/or concert venues usually denoted by the abbreviation Many Club seats provide special access to a VIP club during the show or game. (Please examine listing notes specifically for any further information about possible amenities.)


CLUB PASS: A special pass to a VIP club that’s accessible at the venue during the show or game. Please note that VIP passes do not necessarily include a ticket to the event itself. Club passes also do not necessarily guarantee customers an actual seat at the venue.


CTR/CENT/CENTER: Terms used to characterize various venue areas by describing seats as being located in their "center." This usually occurs in situations where venue seating areas are divided into Left, Right, and/or Center sections. Please note that the terms also can be used slang-wise by ticket sellers without reference to official section labeling.


(DAY OF THE WEEK): A term used to denote a ticket or a pass that is active for an event on a certain day of the week. This labeling is often used for events that occur over a long time span (eg: golf). The tickets concerned are only relevant for the day/s mentioned on the listing.


DAILY: A shorthand term used to denote a Grounds Pass active for a certain day of an event (usually golf or music festivals.)


DC/DR CIR ("Dress Circle"): A curved section or tier of seats in theater and/or concert venues sometimes located above the Orchestra and below the Mezzanine.


FLD/FIELD ("Field"): The seating section in sporting venues that’s usually closest to the playing field. The term is also used to refer to seating on a sports field for concert events (often close to the stage).


FB/FLD BX ("Field Box"): A seating area in sporting (usually baseball) venues located near or on the field. The term “Field Box” is usually described as being on the “Right” or the “Left” of a venue (see “RFB” and “LFB”).


F/FLR/FLOOR ("Floor"): The ground level in concert venues usually populated by folding chairs and non-gradated seating. Floor seating can include reserved seats or General Admission seating.


F/FRT/FRONT ("Front"): Terms used to characterize venue areas by describing seats as being located near a stage or field. The term itself is subjectively based on the ticket seller’s opinion and should be examined alongside section and row specificities.


GA ("General Admission"): Used for first-come, first-serve seating that does not tie event-goers to specific seats. Attendees instead sit or stand wherever they can manage in the venue area allotted to them. “General Admission” is most frequently used as a seating method for “Floor” and/or “Field” seating. It can be advantageous if customers arrive early enough to get first access to the best viewing locations.


GLASS: A term used to describe seats for hockey events that are close to the glass wall separating the rink from the seating.


GROUNDS: A shorthand term used to denote a Grounds Pass active for a certain day of an event (usually golf).


G/GS “(Grandstand”): A seating area in sporting venues at or near the highest level of tiered seating. Grandstand seating is frequently seen (and utilized) for baseball events.


INFIELD RV: A term used to denote a ticket that can be used to park an RV at a NASCAR event within the race track area. The term itself is usually accompanied by specifics denoting the parking location for the RV.


LAWN: A seating section in concert venues located in a non-raised section of seating on the ground. Lawns seating is usually furthest from the stage (outside the main seating area) or closest to the stage (aka: “Field” seating). Customers access it on a General Admissions (first-come, first-service basis) and usually without chaired seating. Many customers bring blankets and fold-up chairs to Lawn seating events.


L/LFT/LEFT: Terms used to characterize various venue areas by describing seats as being located on their “left” side. This usually occurs in situations where venue seating areas are divided into Left, Right, and/or Center sections. Please note that the terms also can be used slang-wise by ticket sellers without reference to official section labeling.


LFB (“Left Field Box”): A general term used to refer to Field Boxes located on the left side of a venue. The term is most often used to describe premium seating for baseball events.


L/LG/LGE ("Loge"): The front rows of the Mezzanine section (see “Mezzanine”) in theater venues. Some venues choose not to label the Loge as a separate area of seating. The term is also used for occasional sports venues in reference to higher seating levels.


LOWER/LOWERS/LOWER LEVEL: Seats that are located in the lower level sections (ie: closer to the field/stage) of a given venue. The exact meaning and location of lower-level seating varies from venue to venue and event to event. It often applies in cases where different levels of seating have similar section designations. "Lower-Level" or "Lower/s" is then used to identify those sections nearer the event performance.


MEZZ ("Mezzanine"): A raised platform in theater venues overhanging the Orchestra but underneath the Balcony. The Mezzanine is usually dubbed the “first balcony” due to its placement below the Balcony proper. The term is also occasionally used to describe some raised seating for sporting venues. (Front row mezzanine seats are often considered some of the best seats for theatrical events.)


ORCH ("Orchestra"): The ground level in theater and concert venues located in front of the staging area. (Seating in the middle Center Orchestra is usually regarded as the best seating for theatrical events.)


PARK/PKG/LOT: A parking pass that gives customers special and guaranteed access to event parking. Please note that parking passes do not include a ticket to the event itself unless specifically indicated.


PASS: A term used to emphasize that the listing concerned does not provide a ticket to the event itself. "Pass" means that the ticket is actually for parking needs, VIP club access, or other non-entry purposes.


PATCH: See “Badge.”


R/RES/RESV ("Reserved"): A general term used in the ticketing industry to refer to seats that have been “reserved” by the ticket seller listing them. “Reserved” seating is the polar opposite of “General Admissions” (first-come, first-serve) seating.


RFB ("Right Field Box"): A general term used to refer to Field Boxes located on the right side of a venue. The term is most often used to describe premium seating for baseball events.


ROWS X-X: Meaning that the tickets concerned could be located within any rows in the range provided. Customers should only purchase from such listings if they are comfortable receiving tickets in any of the rows specified.


SECS X-X: Meaning that the tickets concerned could be located within any section in the range provided. Please note that section designations don’t promise customer seating only in those 2 sections. The range provided is used by sellers to indicate seating located visually (per the venue map) in-between the two sections specified.


S/SR/SRO ("Standing Room Only"): An area in a venue where there are no seats and customers have to stand during the event. "Standing Room Only" is accessed on a first-come, first-serve basis.


S/STE/SUITE ("Suite"): 1) A special ticket to a viewing arena from which a given event can be viewed separately from the general audience. 2) A special ticket to a hotel suite offered by ticket sellers to complement an event experience. Please note that the first type of “Suite” ticketing does not necessarily guarantee customers a reserved seat for the event. Suite tickets usually grant access to the suite and its amenities without specifically guaranteeing reserved seats.


T/TER/TERR ("Terrace"): A term used by some venues to denote the Balcony or a similar expanse of raised seating. The term “terrace” is used both for theater events and also for various sporting events.


T/TWR ("Tower"): A term usually used for sporting events (NASCAR especially) to describe elevated seating. Seats are usually dispersed among various Towers located alongside the racetrack.


TURN X: A general term used to denote seating for NASCAR events located near various turns in the race track.


UPPER/UPPERS/UPPER LEVEL: Seats that are located in the upper level sections (ie: farther from the field/stage) of a given venue. The exact meaning and location of upper-level seating varies from venue to venue and event to event. It often applies in cases where different levels of seating have similar section designations. "Upper Level" or "Upper/s" is then used to identify those sections farther from the event performance.


VIP PASS: A special pass to a VIP club or area that’s accessible at the venue during the show or game. Please note that VIP passes do not necessarily include a ticket to the event itself.


ZONE X: A term used to denote a certain section of a venue that encompasses a large number of seating locales. Zone seating is a recent trend from Europe that chops venues up into large chunks labeled A, B, C or any other such system. This means that a given listing for Zone seating could be located anywhere within the Zone and row/s specified. Please note that this rule does not change the fact that the tickets concerned are guaranteed to be side-by-side (unless explicitly stated otherwise).

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